Sunday, August 6, 2017

Creating Narrative Tension

Creating Narrative Tension
Instructor Bill Johnson, September 4-29, 2017 – $49

Register with PayPal on Pennwriters website
or send a check to Pennwriters, Inc. PO Box 685 Dalton, PA 18414

When a story’s audience is drawn in to feel tension over the course and outcome of a story, that audience will feel a need to experience the relief offered by a story’s resolution and fulfillment. To create this tension, something of interest to a story’s audience has to be set in motion. For example, a storyteller might set in motion an issue revolving around redemption. Because a story’s audience already has feelings and thoughts about redemption and its value, through how a story resolves and fulfills its events, the members of the audience can experience a relief from their own unresolved feelings about redemption, or have their feelings about it validated.

This process of generating narrative tension needs to weave through every aspect of a story to sustain the interest of an audience. A story that lacks narrative tension is un-engaging to its audience.
 
Instructor Bio:
 
Bill Johnson is a produced playwright, optioned screenwriter, and has read manuscript submissions for a literary agent. He is the author of A Story is a Promise and The Spirit of Storytelling, a workbook that explores how to create dramatic, engaging stories; and web master of Essays on the Craft of Dramatic Writing, a site that explores principles of storytelling through reviews of popular movies, books and plays (www.storyispromise.com);

Bill has lead workshops on writing around the United States, including the Southern California Writing Conference, Write on the Sound Conference, and the Expo Screenwriting Conference in Los Angeles.

Link to class information and registration at Penn Writers

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Soul Rider, Facing Fear and Finding Redemption on a Harley

SOUL RIDER

Facing Fear and Finding Redemption on a Harley

By Carolyn Fox

Praise for Soul Rider

“In this inspiring memoir, Fox takes every woman who has longed
to reconnect intimately with herself on an unbelievable ride.”
—Dawn Thompson, Portland Women Writers

“Soul Rider is a lesson in how stepping out of your comfort zone
and conquering your fear can lead you to the life that you are meant
to live.”
 —Annette White, author of Bucket List Adventures: 10 Incredible
Journeys to Experience Before You Die

“Fox was one of the first women in modern history to venture out
on her motorcycle on a (mid)life-changing solo journey. Her stories
of freedom and liberation will inspire others to do the same for
generations to come.”
 —Genevieve Schmitt, founder/editor of WomenRidersNow.com

This is the story of a woman who went on an incredible journey. Carolyn Fox was a single mother and lawyer haunted with grief and secrets, and facing her fiftieth birthday. She decided to change her life by facing her fears: she bought a Harley, packed it with a sleeping bag and tent, and set out to ride through all fifty states—alone! Soul Rider:

About the Author
Carolyn Fox started law school at forty-one, learned to ride a motorcycle at age forty-six, and obtained her private pilot license at sixty. She has also worked as a private investigator and served as a grant writer to help fund nonprofit organizations. She resides in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

 “Many people wrestle with their demons all their lives. . . . Her story is a road map to those stuck in
life and needing a lift.”
—Bill Johnson, author of A Story Is a Promise & the Spirit of Storytelling

“Fox’s drive is inspiring and her prose beautiful.”
—Ali Shaw, executive editor, Indigo Editing & Publications

Available on Amazon

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Writer's Survey

When I first started reading manuscripts, I came across particular character issues time after time: main characters who are stuck, emotionally numb, unable to express intimate feelings, or too conflicted or wounded to act.

I came to recognize these character personas are an extension of the storyteller's feelings and mind set. A storyteller who feels 'stuck' in life creates a main character who mirrors that. Emotionally numb authors create emotionally numb main characters. Writers with issues around intimacy create characters unable to express or feel love. Wounded writers create wounded heroic characters who can only react, not act. I call this personal storytelling.

To help writers recognize when characters are being created for an internal story promise, I've created a number of creative personality types and how they affect writing choices. When writers read the personality types, I ask them to identify which types they see reflected in themselves.

I then read ten manuscript pages to explore how the writer's personality affected their choices in storytelling.

My notes on the ten pages will review how I perceive that a writer's personality affected their choice of characters and the kinds of words they use to tell a story, and offer notes on the pages using my A Story is a Promise concepts.

This is ten pages of the beginning of a story, in 12 point font, double-spaced.

For $10, writers get the opening to their novels reviewed.

Contact me at bjscript@teleport.com if you are interested.

Must be a U.S. resident and have mastered basic writing skills.


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To read some of my reviews of popular movies, novels, and plays, check out my writing workbook, A Story is a Promise & The Spirit of Storytelling, available on Amazon's Kindle and Barnes and Noble's Nook.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Applications for the 2018 Oregon Literary Fellowships are available online.


Applications are due on Monday, July 10, 2017, and there is no fee to apply. Writers and publishers who are current, full-time Oregon residents are eligible, and we especially
encourage emerging writers to apply.
 


Click here to learn more about Oregon Literary Fellowships.
  


In 2018, we will award twelve writers and two publishers with fellowships of $3,500 each. This financial support helps working artists develop or complete literary projects, creating opportunity and space for their stories to be written and heard.
  


As part of the application, writers can choose to be considered for the Writers of Color Fellowship. This grant is designed to promote perspectives from a variety of cultural, ethnic,
and racial backgrounds, and encourage diverse writers to apply for Oregon Literary fellowships.  

Friday, June 9, 2017

Visibility and Book Sales: Marketing Your Small Press Book

Tuesday, June 13, 2017
7:00pm - 8:00pm


Lake Oswego Public Library
706 4th St, Lake Oswego, OR 97034


With over 800 books per day published in the US alone, publicity for small press books has never been more necessary...and more difficult.


The goal of "Visibility and Book Sales: Marketing Your Small Press Book" is to provide writers of all genres with the necessary tools, money saving techniques, and networking skills to market their books with maximum effectiveness. Topics include: creating a cohesive business strategy, utilizing traditional and social media, giving readings and other methods of selling books, balancing your marketing budget, and thinking outside the box to find your fans.


John Sibley Williams works as Marketing Director of Portland publisher Inkwater Press and as a small press literary agent, successfully representing dozens of emerging authors. He is the editor of two Northwest literary anthologies and the author of nine poetry collections. A five-time Pushcart nominee and winner of various national awards, John has spent the past six years helping authors navigate the complex worlds of traditional and self-publishing. He lives in Portland, Oregon. You can visit him at https://johnsibleywilliams.wordpress.com/.


This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Lake Oswego Public Library. The library is located at 706 Fourth Street, Lake Oswego. For more information, contact Fawn Dabrowiak at 503-675-3995 or fdabrowiak@ci.oswego.or.us.



For more information, visit: https://www.ci.oswego.or.us/library/visibility-and-book-sales-marketing-your-small-press-book.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Auntie M’s Guide to Greaseless Self-Promotion


  • “Yeah, writing is great, but I tell you what I really love: constantly shilling my book to a crowd of indifferent strangers.” Said no writer, ever. But while marketing yourself is an unavoidable task, it doesn’t have to be an unbearable chore. If you’re disappointed, burned out, or just wondering where to start, this workshop is for you. 

    On June 6th at 6:30PM at the Old Church, we’ll work together to help you find your audience, harness your talents, and rekindle your enthusiasm – one step at a time.

    Arianne “Tex” Thompson is home-grown Texas success story. After earning a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s in literature, she channeled her passion for exciting, innovative, and inclusive fiction into the Children of the Drought – an internationally-published epic fantasy Western series from Solaris.

    Now a professional speaker and creative writing instructor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Tex is blazing a trail through writers conferences, workshops, and fan conventions around the country – as an endlessly energetic, relentlessly enthusiastic one-woman stampede. 

    Find her online at www.TheTexFiles.com! http://www.TheTexFiles.com
     
    Details


    Willamette Writers Portland chapter meets on the first Tuesday of the month, 7:00-8:00 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm) at the Historic Old Church in downtown Portland. No meetings August.

    The meeting is free to members of Willamette Writers and full time students under 25; guests, $5.

    Interested? Join us! All writers welcome.

    Click here to learn more about Willamette Writers Portland, http://www.willamettewriters.org.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Write Around Portland 52nd Book Release & Free Public Reading

                                 
Write Around Portland runs community-building creative writing workshops at hospitals, schools, homeless youth shelters, senior centers, low-income housing buildings, prisons, treatment facilities and social service agencies.
 


Write Around Portland releases its 52nd anthology—Illuminated by the Words / Iluminados por las palabras—of community writing by adult and youth participants from our spring 2017 workshops held throughout the Portland metro area. The anthology includes introductions by Putsata Reang, author and international journalist recently honored with an award that recognizes women writing for social change, and Linda Apperson, Write Around Portland volunteer facilitator, drama mentor at Cleveland High School and author of Stage Managing and Theatre Etiquette.
       

                                  
Write Around Portland invites you to attend one or both of our free community readings featuring powerful work written by participants in our spring 2017 writing workshops. Readers will include youth experiencing homelessness; middle school students; high school students in alternative school settings; youth and adults with developmental disabilities; members of low-income housing and assisted living communities and many others.
  



Reading
The Beaverton Round Executive Suites, 12725 SW Millikan Way, Suite 300, Beaverton, OR 97005 located at the Beaverton Central MAX station.

Wednesday, May 24th, 6:30–8:00pm
  


Admission is FREE, but donations of any amount are accepted to support the work of Write Around Portland. We will also be collecting donations of new journals for writers in our fall 2017 workshops. ADA-accessible. Copies of Illuminated by the Words / Iluminados por las palabras will be available for purchase for $12.